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Saturday, July 4, 2015

Sibling Saturday: Mayo Brothers in the Revolutionary War

My 5th-great-grandfather Stephen Mayo was a private in the Revolutionary War. He was a minuteman in Captain Thompson's company under Major Campbell, a private in Captain Moses Hawkins'/Capt. John Overton's company, Colonel Charles Lewis' 14th Virginia regiment, a private in Captain Hatcher's Virginia company, and a private in Captain Anthony Hayden's Virginia company.

Stephen Mayo compiled service record. Compiled Service Records of Soldiers who Served in the American Army during the Revolutionary War, 1775-1783. NARA microfilm publication M881, roll 1081. Virginia, Fourteenth Regiment. The National Archives at Washington, D.C.Available from Fold3.

Stephen's brother Benjamin was also in the 14th Virginia regiment. They were at Valley Forge together.
Benjamin Mayo compiled service record. Compiled Service Records of Soldiers who Served in the American Army during the Revolutionary War, 1775-1783. NARA microfilm publication M881, roll 1081. Virginia, Fourteenth Regiment. The National Archives at Washington, D.C.Available from Fold3.

Their brother Joseph was a 2nd lieutenant in the Fluvanna County, Virginia Militia.

McAllister, J. T. Virginia Militia in the Revolutionary War: McAllister's Data. Hot Springs, Virginia: McAllister Publishing, 1913. Page 23. Available from Internet Archive

Their brother James was in the Albemarle County, Virginia Militia. Their half-brother Valentine Mayo was a private in the Continental Troops. Other Mayo brothers may have served as well. 

Friday, July 3, 2015

Funeral Card Friday: Rebecca (Dawson) Mayo

Image from shamurah on Ancestry.com

Rebecca Dawson was born in Virginia on 5 January 1814. On 24 November 1834, she married my 5th-great-grandfather Stephen Mayo. They had a daughter, Martha. Stephen died on 16 March 1847. By 1850, Rebecca lived with her daughter in Newbern, Pulaski County, Virginia. She died on 7 March 1904. She was the second to last surviving Revolutionary War widow.

Thursday, July 2, 2015

New Jersey State Constitution

New Jersey State Constitution, 1776. Available from the New Jersey Department of State.

New Jersey adopted its first state constitution on 2 July 1776. It was the fourth of the colonies to adopt a constitution declaring independence from Great Britain. The constitution was drafted over five days, and it was signed in Provincial Congress in Burlington, New Jersey by Samuel Tucker and William Paterson. Within 48 hours, the constitution had been ratified.

The original constitution was only supposed to be a temporary charter, but it remained the state constitution for sixty-eight years. the constitution was revised in 1844 and rewritten in 1947.

References
Constitutionally New Jersey
History of the New Jersey State Constitution
1776 State Constitution
"Throwback Thursday: The Garden State's Constitutional Roots." The Star-Ledger, 2 July 2015, p. 15.

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Canada Day

Various ethnic groups from many areas on Canada Day and the Centennial of Confederation (Montreal, Canada). 1 July 1967. Photo by Ray Duguay. [Copyrighted free use. Copyright held by the Library and Archives Canada. Restrictions on use: nil.] Available from Wikimedia Commons.

July 1 is Canada Day, the anniversary of the Constitution Act, 1867 (formerly called the British North America Act), which united New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and the United Province of Canada) into a single country, Canada. The day was originally called Dominion Day. It was renamed Canada Day after the Parliament of the United Kingdom enacted the Canada Act in 1982, which made Canada completely independent.

Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Tombstone Tuesday: Olivia G. (Zieroff) Gersbacher


Olivia G. Zieroff was born in Missouri (probably in St. Louis) on 2 September 1899. She was the daughter of Joseph F. Zieroff and Marguerite Hartung. She married John Henry Gersbacher, the son of my great-grandmother's brother Joseph John Gersbacher. They had a daughter and a son, and eventually divorced. Olivia died on 4 August 1994. She is buried in Sts. Peter and Paul Catholic Cemetery in St. Louis.

Monday, June 29, 2015

Mappy Monday: Map of Virginia and Maryland

A Map of Virginia and Maryland. Francis Lamb. The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britain, 1676. Huntingfield Collection, MSA SC 1399-1-197. Image from the Maryland State Archives, Charts and Maps Used by the Early Settlers of Maryland.

This map, which has been made available by the Maryland State Archives, depicts colonial Virginia and Maryland during the 1600s. Some of my ancestors lived in Maryland and Virginia during this time period.

Sunday, June 28, 2015

52 Ancestors: Week 26 "Halfway": Annie Cox

The theme for Week 26 of the 52 Ancestors Challenge is "Halfway." I have chosen to write about Annie Cox because she was my great-great-grandmother Sarah Claire "Sadie" Dyer's half-sister, and because her life was short (actually, less than half the length that she could have lived).

Annie was born about 1872 in Tennessee (probably Nashville, since that is where her family lived). She was the first child that my 3rd-great-grandmother Mary had with her second husband John Cox. Annie lost her father when she was about six years old; John Cox died in 1878. In 1880, Mary Cox headed the household. Annie was then known as Nannie. She and her older half-brother Mike Dyer were attending school.

1880 United States census, Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee, population schedule, enumeration district 43, page no. 38. Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. 

The 1895-1897 Nashville city directories list Annie as an operator working at 180 N. College. While researching my Tarkington relatives (on another line), I learned that this was the Cumberland Telephone & Telegraph Co. Annie and my other relatives were telephone operators. Annie lived in the household of her mother, who was a grocer. They were listed at a different address in each directory.

Nashville City Directory, vol. 31, 1895. Joel Davis, comp. Nashville: Marshall & Bruce. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

Nashville City Directory, vol. 32, 1896. Joel Davis, comp. Nashville: Marshall & Bruce. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

Nashville City Directory, vol. 33, 1897. Joel Davis, comp. Nashville: Marshall & Bruce. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. 

Annie lost two siblings during this time. Her older half-brother Michael J. Dyer died of congestion of the brain on 24 December 1895, and her younger brother William Cox died from abscess of the lungs on 2 March 1896.

Annie died in Nashville, Tennessee on 19 July 1898. She was only 26 years old. Her cause of death was pulmonary tuberculosis. Her funeral was held at the Cathedral of Nashville (now St. Mary's Catholic Church). She was buried in Calvary Cemetery,  Section 10, Lot 3, Space 11 on 20 July 1898.

My great-great-grandmother Sadie (Dyer) Gatlin's daughter Anna Elizabeth Gatlin may have been named after Annie (whose given name was probably Anna.)

Annie Cox death record. Ancestry.com. Tennessee, City Death Records, 1872-1923 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Original data: Tennessee City Death Records Nashville, Knoxville, Chattanooga, Memphis 1848-1907. Nashville, Tennessee: Tennessee State Library and Archives.

Annie Cox death record (2nd half of page.) Ancestry.com. Tennessee, City Death Records, 1872-1923 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Original data: Tennessee City Death Records Nashville, Knoxville, Chattanooga, Memphis 1848-1907. Nashville, Tennessee: Tennessee State Library and Archives.

 Nashville Banner, 20 July 1898, page 7